Powerful Photos Reveal The Real People Behind The Military Uniforms

Whether you think soldiers are upstanding heroes or jack-booted thugs, few of us actually take the time to consider the people behind those imposing uniforms. Photographer Devin Mitchell, however, created a touching photo project called “The Soldier Art Project” that examines what lies on the other side of the uniform.
Using Photoshop, Mitchell has created images of uniformed servicemen and women whose mirrored reflections reveal who they are – and vice versae.
“The military community has expressed their interest in using my art to communicate how many of them feel to be living double lives while serving in the military,” Mitchell told Mic. “People who have never served have shown interest in knowing more about the diversified aspects of what causes veterans to feel that way.”
More info: devinography.com | Flickr | Instagram (h/t: mic)

“One photo that really speaks to me the most is the picture depicting Joshua Zitting and his husband Patrick Lehmann,” said Mitchell, who is openly gay himself. “It reminds me of how unfair it is that this man can serve while enjoying all of this constitutional rights as an American, while other men and women similar to him cannot in other parts of the country, due in part to recent decisions such as the one made by circuit judge Jeffrey Sutton. Judges like him are blind in my eyes. Maybe pictures like this will help him see better.”

Spectacular Photos Of Meals From Other Countries. I Love #14…

There is a saying, that the best way to learn about a culture is through it’s food. National Geographic has taken this idea to a whole new level. #yourplate is a delicious photo series where foodies share their cuisine and put forth a whole new perspective on food. Here are some of the edibles that stand out most to us.

#2. Vienna, Austria – Market selling fresh mozzarella.

Dimitra Glariti

#3. Copan, Honduras – Ticucos, tamales filled with beans.

Lourdes A.

#4. Beijing, China – Street vendors selling seafood.

Dimitra Glariti

#5. Latium, Italy – Delicious morning coffee while reading the paper.

HEATHER W.

#6. Roadside fruit stand.

Saad Shaikh

#7. Voi, Kenya – Women selling mangoes with chilli powder.

Tessa Chilala

#8. Punjab, India – Sikh temple continuing 16th century old tradition of feeding those in need.

Teodora Lazarova

#9. West Bengal, India – noodles in diverse texture and flavors.

dev banerjee

#10. China – colorful plate of rice.

Arnaud Cabanel

#11. Tel Aviv, Israel – Raw egg with salt and pepper.

limor sidi

#12. Macedonia – Brick oven baking bread.

Olgica Ilievska

#13. France – Penny bun mushrooms.

Valeria Klassen

#14. Tel Aviv, Israel – Fresh red grenades or pomegranates.

Ori Lubin

#15. Venezuela – Stuffed avocado.

Hernan Anzola

#16. Balearic Islands, Spain – Traditionall paella.

Terry Dunn

#17. Venezie, Italy – Pasta store.

Alberto Andrich

#18. Mexico City, Mexico – Restaurant’s wine rack.

Santiago Belaunzaran

Submit your photos at #yourplate with appetizing dishes.

Source:
nationalgeographic.com

What It’s Like Listening To Your Kid Talk About Minecraft

Of course, I’m listening. Go on.

“I had to gather a lot of wood to build a shelter because there are these monsters that might’ve got me if I didn’t.”

HBO

“And, uh, I gathered stone, too, for the shelter. It took a long time to make because monsters kept coming.”

The CW

“And then I fell into lava! Can you believe that?”

Warner Bros.

“It totally set me back. Plus I needed to eat because my hunger bar was draining.”

ABC

View Entire List ›

What It’s Like Listening To Your Kid Talk About Minecraft

Of course, I’m listening. Go on.

“I had to gather a lot of wood to build a shelter because there are these monsters that might’ve got me if I didn’t.”

HBO

“And, uh, I gathered stone, too, for the shelter. It took a long time to make because monsters kept coming.”

The CW

“And then I fell into lava! Can you believe that?”

Warner Bros.

“It totally set me back. Plus I needed to eat because my hunger bar was draining.”

ABC

View Entire List ›

“Mockingjay – Part 1” Has Lowest “Hunger Games” Franchise U.S. Debut

The film’s $123 million domestic opening weekend is also, however, the best of the year. Hollywood is weird sometimes.

Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

Murray Close / Lionsgate

Only in Hollywood could making $123 million in three days ever be seen as a disappointment.

That is the unusual fate befalling The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1, which opened to that lofty estimated figure at the domestic box office this weekend. While $123 million is good enough to give the movie the biggest U.S. debut of 2014 — besting the June opening of Transformers: Age of Extinction — it is also the lowest debut for the Hunger Games franchise by a hefty margin. The Hunger Games opened at $152 million in March 2012, and its sequel Catching Fire debuted with $158.1 million this time last year, one of the biggest opening weekends ever at the box office.

But Mockingjay – Part 1’s debut represents a 22% drop from Catching Fire’s record-breaking high. Frigid weather in much of the U.S., and a lack of IMAX screens (currently booked for Interstellar) could account for a portion of the drop off. Some audiences could have been wary of the film’s darker tone, while others could have been turned off by Lionsgate’s decision to follow in the footsteps of big franchises that came before it, by splitting Suzanne Collins’ novel into two parts, extending the franchise — and the box office receipts — for another year.

Whatever the reasons for Mockingjay – Part 1’s relative drop in box office returns, however, it’s another representation of 2014’s domestic box office slump: Returns in the U.S. are down 4.9% from this time a year ago, and 6.4% from 2012.

Internationally, however, the box office picture for Mockingjay – Part 1 is far rosier: The film took in an estimated $152 million in 85 overseas markets this weekend. Not only is that the first time a Hunger Games movie has grossed more in its opening weekend overseas than in the U.S., but Mockingjay – Part 1’s foreign box office earnings actually improved on Catching Fire’s international debut by roughly 4%.

The overseas market has been a wildly potent area for growth for the Hunger Games franchise in general. Catching Fire’s $440.2 million foreign total improved a whopping 55% over the first film’s $283.2 million international gross. While Mockingjay – Part 1’s overseas box office almost certainly won’t improve at that same magnitude, the movie is on a far more welcome trajectory for its international distributors.

As for Lionsgate — which distributes the Hunger Games films in the U.S. as well as bankrolling the productions — there is always hope for Mockingjay – Part 2, opening Nov. 20, 2015.

Here are the estimated top 10 box office figures for Friday to Sunday, courtesy of Box Office Mojo:

1. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1* — $123 million
2. Big Hero 6 — $20.1 million
3. Interstellar — $15.1 million
4. Dumb and Dumber To — $13.8 million
5. Gone Girl — $2.8 million
6. Beyond the Lights — $2.6 million
7. St. Vincent — $2.4 million
8. Fury — $1.9 million
9. Birdman — $1.85 million
10. The Theory of Everything — $1.5 million

*Opening weekend

LINK: The 7 Biggest Challenges Bringing Mockingjay – Part 1 From The Page To The Screen

View Entire List ›

“Mockingjay – Part 1” Has Lowest “Hunger Games” Franchise U.S. Debut

The film’s $123 million domestic opening weekend is also, however, the best of the year. Hollywood is weird sometimes.

Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

Murray Close / Lionsgate

Only in Hollywood could making $123 million in three days ever be seen as a disappointment.

That is the unusual fate befalling The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1, which opened to that lofty estimated figure at the domestic box office this weekend. While $123 million is good enough to give the movie the biggest U.S. debut of 2014 — besting the June opening of Transformers: Age of Extinction — it is also the lowest debut for the Hunger Games franchise by a hefty margin. The Hunger Games opened at $152 million in March 2012, and its sequel Catching Fire debuted with $158.1 million this time last year, one of the biggest opening weekends ever at the box office.

But Mockingjay – Part 1’s debut represents a 22% drop from Catching Fire’s record-breaking high. Frigid weather in much of the U.S., and a lack of IMAX screens (currently booked for Interstellar) could account for a portion of the drop off. Some audiences could have been wary of the film’s darker tone, while others could have been turned off by Lionsgate’s decision to follow in the footsteps of big franchises that came before it, by splitting Suzanne Collins’ novel into two parts, extending the franchise — and the box office receipts — for another year.

Whatever the reasons for Mockingjay – Part 1’s relative drop in box office returns, however, it’s another representation of 2014’s domestic box office slump: Returns in the U.S. are down 4.9% from this time a year ago, and 6.4% from 2012.

Internationally, however, the box office picture for Mockingjay – Part 1 is far rosier: The film took in an estimated $152 million in 85 overseas markets this weekend. Not only is that the first time a Hunger Games movie has grossed more in its opening weekend overseas than in the U.S., but Mockingjay – Part 1’s foreign box office earnings actually improved on Catching Fire’s international debut by roughly 4%.

The overseas market has been a wildly potent area for growth for the Hunger Games franchise in general. Catching Fire’s $440.2 million foreign total improved a whopping 55% over the first film’s $283.2 million international gross. While Mockingjay – Part 1’s overseas box office almost certainly won’t improve at that same magnitude, the movie is on a far more welcome trajectory for its international distributors.

As for Lionsgate — which distributes the Hunger Games films in the U.S. as well as bankrolling the productions — there is always hope for Mockingjay – Part 2, opening Nov. 20, 2015.

Here are the estimated top 10 box office figures for Friday to Sunday, courtesy of Box Office Mojo:

1. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1* — $123 million
2. Big Hero 6 — $20.1 million
3. Interstellar — $15.1 million
4. Dumb and Dumber To — $13.8 million
5. Gone Girl — $2.8 million
6. Beyond the Lights — $2.6 million
7. St. Vincent — $2.4 million
8. Fury — $1.9 million
9. Birdman — $1.85 million
10. The Theory of Everything — $1.5 million

*Opening weekend

LINK: The 7 Biggest Challenges Bringing Mockingjay – Part 1 From The Page To The Screen

View Entire List ›